Write Amazing Cover Letter

Samples of the Best Cover Letters

Cover Letter Examples Listed by Type of Job and Letter

When applying for a job, you should always include a cover letter. Even if a job listing does not specifically request a cover letter, it can be a terrific way to summarize your skills and experiences, and explain (in more detail than a resume) why you are an ideal candidate for the job.

It's important to write a letter that specifies what makes you one of the best candidates for the position. Your cover letter should be well written, and should be targeted to the position for which you are applying.

Make connections between your experiences and the skills required to excel in the job. Your cover letter is one of the first thing the hiring manager will see (along with your resume), so make sure it grabs the reader’s attention.

Use these cover letter samples to get ideas for your own cover letters, so you can show employers why you should be selected for an interview.

How to Use Cover Letter Samples

Cover letter samples are a great place to start before writing your own letter. Read through some of the samples below, focusing on ones related to your industry.

These samples can help you format your letter. They can also give you ideas for the language you might want to use, and the information you should include.

However, be sure to customize your letter to fit your own skills and experience, and the job for which you are applying. You can also alter the format of a resume example. For instance, if the example has three paragraphs, and you only want to include two paragraphs, you can do so.

Also be sure to read this list of tips for writing a strong cover letter, and this detailed cover letter guide. If you are having trouble with a particular section of your cover letter, check out these articles on cover letter salutations, cover letter closings, and parts of a cover letter.

Best Cover Letter Samples

Review an alphabetical list of great cover letter examples listed by occupation, as well as by type of cover letter.

 Use these examples to get ideas for your own cover letters.

A - E

·       Academic Advisor

·       Academic Cover Letter

·       Academic Cover Letter (science)

·       Administration/Business

·       Administrative Coordinator

·       Admissions Counselor

·       Applying for More Than One Job

·       Arts

·       Assistant

·       Athletic Director

·       Biomedical Engineer

·       Block Format Cover Letter

·       Business/Technical (with referral)

·       Camp Counselor

·       Career Change

·       Cold Contact Cover Letter

·       College Graduate

·       College Graduate

·       College Student

·       Communications

·       Communications Director (email cover letter)

·       Construction Management

·       Consultant

·       Cook

·       Customer Service

·       Database Administrator

·       Development/Museum Position

·       Director of Operations

·       eCommerce

·       Editorial

·       Editorial Assistant (email cover letter)

·       Education

·       Education/Alternative Education

·       Email Cover Letters

·       Employee Referral

·       Entry Level (analyst)

·       Entry Level (finance) 

·       Entry Level (marketing)

·       Event Planner

F - M

·       Faculty Position

·       Finance Internship

·       Flight Attendant

·       Freelance

·       Front End Web Developer

·       Golf Caddy

·       Hair Stylist

·       Higher Education Communications

·       Information Security Analyst

·       Informational Meeting Request Letter

·       Internal Marketing (with referral)

·       Internship

·       Job Promotion Cover Letters (communications and retail)

·       Job Transfer Request Letter

·       Job Transfer Request Letter Example (relocation)

·       Legal

·       Letter of Interest

·       Letter of Interest

·       Librarian

·       Lifeguard

·       Market Research Analyst

·       Marketing Assistant (college student)

·       Media Relations (college graduate)

N - R

·       Nanny

·       Networking Cover Letters

·       Occupational Therapist

·       Office Assistant (part-time)

·       Organizer

·       Part-Time Job

·       Photographer

·       Physical Therapist

·       Programmer Analyst

·       Promotion

·       Prospecting Letter

·       Receptionist

·       Recruiting Manager

·       Referral

·       Referred by a Contact

·       Request a Meeting

·       Research Technician

·       Retail Management

S - Z

·       Salary History

·       Salary Range

·       Salary Requirements

·       Sales

·       Sales Associate (summer)

·      

How to write the perfect cover letter

We spoke to some job search experts to find out what you need to know to write the perfect cover letter.

Your cover letter is typically the first impression you make with the hiring manager, so you’ll want to put in the effort necessary to get it right. We spoke to some job search experts to find out what you need to know to write the perfect cover letter.

Pick your purpose

Of course your goal is to get the job, but there are several kinds of cover letters that can help you achieve that goal — and knowing the kind you want to write will help you get yours right. “They all have a purpose,” says Brenda Collard-Mills, owner of Robust Resumes and Resources. “There is the traditional cover letter to reply to an advertised job, a networking cover letter, a cover letter targeted to recruiters, the direct mail cover letter and the pain cover letter,” which addresses a specific pain point the company may have and how you would be able to solve it. “Research when to use each type and incorporate as many as possible when conducting an active job search.”

Reflect the company’s culture

Go beyond using keywords from the ad and find a way to make your cover letter reflect what the company is all about. “For example, if applying to a data analysis, statistically focused company, your cover letter should be equally quantified and appealing to data-thirsty readers,” says Erik Bowitz, of the nonprofit organization Copy My Resume. “If you are applying for a position in a young, creative company then your cover letter should be more casual and fluid, using words like active, social or even organic to better reflect the ideals of the individuals you are hoping to work with.”

Focus on the organization’s needs

You want a job, but you need to focus on what the employer wants if you hope to succeed, says Lynne Sarikas, director of the MBA Career Center at the D’Amore McKim School of Business. “Be very specific in addressing their needs outlined in the job description and show them how you can address their specific needs.” Presenting yourself as a solution to a hiring manager’s problem can help your cover letter take the right tone. Donna Shannon, president of Personal Touch Career Services and author of “How to Get a Job Without Going Crazy,” recommends providing specific examples of how you can help the company. “A salesperson can discuss how they will increase the revenue of the company. An executive assistant can speak about the problems they solve on a daily basis. The IT professional can write about how they can improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the systems, thereby saving the company money. Always think: how can I help this company?”

Sublimate your ego

As you focus on the company’s needs, use the word “I” sparingly, says Sarikas. “The cover is letter is about meeting their needs, so be very careful not to overuse ‘I.’ Do not start every paragraph or multiple sentences with ‘I.’ Think about different ways to get your message across.”


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